About Us

About Malheur Field Station

Our History

The Station was built in 1965 on 320 acres of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge as a Job Corps center and housed 200 teenage youths and their supervisors. They attended classes and worked for the Malheur NWR to build dikes, roads, dams and fences. Because of federal budget cuts, the Malheur Job Corps Center was shut down in 1969.

In 1971, the facilities were converted to Malheur Field Station, a biological field station, through a grant from the National Science Foundation to a consortium of northwest colleges and universities. The consortium managed the Field Station and classes were accredited through Pacific University.

By the mid-1980s, the expense of maintaining the aging facility was too great for the consortium and, in 1987, The Great Basin Society, Inc. was established to continue the educational mission of the Field Station.

About Us Today

Board of Directors

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Laney Bardeen –  is a life-long birdwatcher and outdoor enthusiast, and has been going to Malheur since 1974. She worked at the Field Station for a couple of seasons and has been an active board member of the Station for 20 years. She is a web content manager in Corvallis, Oregon.

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Janet Lambersom – Secretary of the Board – is a retired marine biologist and has been a backyard bird watcher all her life. She has been more actively birding since about 2003 and enjoys travel, especially finding new (to her) species of birds in new places. She has been visiting Malheur since 2006 and has been a Board member since 2016. She is interested in all aspects of natural history of the High Desert, including plants, geology and range management.

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Jim Monroe – is a semi-retired United Methodist pastor, and has been coming to Malheur annually and staying at the Malheur Field Station since the early 1990’s. He has lived most of his adult life in Oregon, with time lived in both Japan and Kenya. He has led week-long excursions to Malheur for a number of years, and also leads work teams to Kenya on a regular basis, always taking at least one day of safari just to focus on the birds of East Africa. He has been a board member since 2015. When not birding he is fly fishing.

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Field Station Staff

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Our Future

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American Avocet
American Bittern
American Coot
American Crow
American Goldfinch
American Kestrel
American Robin
American Tree Sparrow
American White Pelican
American Wigeon
Bald Eagle
Barn Swallow
Belted Kingfisher
Black Tern
Black-billed Magpie
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Black-headed Grosbeak
Black-necked Stilt
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Blue-winged Teal
Bobolink
Brewer’s Sparrow
Bufflehead
Bullock’s Oriole
Burrowing Owl
Bushtit

Tennessee Warbler
Townsend’s Solitaire
Townsend’s Warbler
Tree Swallow
Trumpeter Swan
Turkey Vulture
Varied Thrush
Violet Green Swallow
Virginia Rail
Warbling Vireo
Western Kingbird
Western Meadowlark
Western Tanager
Whimbrel
White-faced Ibis
Willet
Wilson’s Phalarope
Wilson’s Snipe
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Yellow-rump Warbler

Orange-crowned Warbler
Osprey
Pied-billed Grebe
Prairie Falcon
Red-tailed Hawk
Red-winged Blackbird
Redhead
Ring-billed Gull
Ring-neck Pheasant
Ring-necked Duck
Rock Pigeon
Rock Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Ruddy Duck
Rufus Hummingbird
Sage Thrasher
Sandhill Crane
Savannah Sparrow
Say’s Phoebe
Short-eared Owl
Song Sparrow
Spotted Sandpiper
Spotted Towhee
Swainson’s Hawk
Swainson’s Thrush

Killdeer
Lark Sparrow
Lesser Scaup
Lesser Yellowlegs
Lewis’ Woodpecker
Loggerhead Shrike
Long-billed Curlew
Long-eared Owl
Mallard
Marsh Wren
Mourning Dove
Nashville Warbler
Northern Flicker
Northern Harrier
Northern Pintail
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Northern Shoveler

Eared Grebe
Eastern Kingbird
European Starling
Eurasian Collared Dove
Ferruginous Hawk
Flammulated Owl
Forster’s Tern
Gadwall
Golden Eagle
Gray Flycatcher
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Great Horned Owl
Greater Sage Grouse
Greater Yellowlegs
Green-winged Teal
Hairy Woodpecker
Hermit Thrush
Horned Grebe
Horned Lark
House Finch
House Sparrow
House Wren

Cackling Goose
California Quail
Calliope Hummingbird
Canada Goose
Canvasback
Canyon Wren
Caspian Tern
Cassin’s Vireo
Chipping Sparrow
Cinnamon Teal
Clark’s Grebe
Cliff Swallow
Common Loon
Common Merganser
Common Nighthawk
Common Poorwill
Common Raven
Common Yellowthroat
Cooper’s Hawk
Dark-eyed Junco
Double-crested Cormorant
Downy Woodpecker