2019 Annual Members Meeting

September 13-14, 2019. Join us at the MFS for a weekend of fun and appreciation dinner! Last year was a huge success, we are planning for the same this year. Please join us on station for our MFS members meeting this September! Call for lodging reservations now! RSVP for dinner!

Friday Sept 13:
Evening Social

Saturday Sept 14:
Field Trips / Morning TBA / Afternoon “Birding with the Board”


Evening speaker: Steve Arndt (Author of “Oregon Ghosts Towns A-Z” and “Roads Less Traveled in Oregon”

Saturday a nice dinner will be provided by MFS. To make sure there is plenty for all, please call 541-493-2629 or email malheurfieldstation@gmail.com to RSVP.

Post meeting Update:  View the slide show of the meet and greet at Greaswood Hall. Everyone had a good time.

Good food is always a big hit
The refurbished pool tables were popular
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When we started in on this clean-up and improvement project the laundry room had been delegated as a storage area.

Laundry Room Cleanup

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When we started in on this clean-up and improvement project the laundry room had been delegated as a storage area. As you can see by this before photo and the one below, a lot of “stuff” found its way into the laundry work space.

Some of the things belonged there like housekeeping supplies but much of the clutter belonged elsewhere or in the dump. The open space was so limited it was hard for two people to use it at the same time.

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Here it is all cleaned up and organized with all the cleaning and housekeeping supplies necessary to maintain our whole facility. It is now much more useful but still needs commercial size washers and dryers to speed up the process.

Doug was pleased with the new ample work space he celebrated it with new paint job.

This Spring (2019) Stan, a retired electronics engineer from Washington state, volunteered to address the damaged screen problem on the entire Field Station.

108 Screens Repaired

The next time you visit the field station and find yourself in a room devoid of mosquitoes or flies, thank Stan Tomich. This Spring (2019) Stan, a retired electronics engineer from Washington state, volunteered to address the damaged screen problem on the entire Field Station.

He removed all the damaged screens from all the major buildings and setup shop in the Greaswood building and proceeded to patiently replace the screening in each frame one at a time. When he got done the count was a whopping 108 screens ready to be reinstalled!

Mark Miller and David Hibbs from Corvallis who were also volunteering at the time–helping sort lots of recycling–stepped up to the plate and helped Stan with the massive reinstallation. Thank you Stan, Mark and David.

April, 2019, Ann Wyatt of Baker City declined the photo op but helped with creating an up-to-date inventory of t-shirts and sweatshirts at our gift shop!

Mother - Daughter Painting Volunteers

You don’t have to have your picture taken if you volunteer. April, 2019, Ann Wyatt of Baker City declined the photo op but helped with creating an up-to-date inventory of t-shirts and sweatshirts at our gift shop! And that’s not all. The 91-year-old also joined her daughter Jill and painted rooms in one of the dorms.

Ann first came to Malheur Field Station with the Golden Eagle Audubon Society over 20 years ago when she lived in Boise.
“I was hooked,” she says of that visit. “I’ve been back every spring and fall since.”

The trips to volunteer are in addition to birding trips. She has a little more time since giving up competitive race walking when she turned 80. “I still came in first, but that may be because I was the only one in that age category.”

We don’t know if there’s a competition for painters, but she’s a champion in our book. “Thanks to you, I found something I always loved doing, that I can still do at 91–PAINT!” she said. Thank You, Ann and Jill.

July 19 - 21, 2019 - Cheryl Beyer, M.S. and Janel Johnson, M.S will lead this field course to investigate the endemics, Sierra relics and Great Basin native plants found at Steens and Hart Mountains' floristic “junctions.”

Great Basin Flora: Botanizing on Steens and Hart Mountains

July 19 – 21, 2019 – Cheryl Beyer, M.S. and Janel Johnson, M.S will lead this field course to investigate the endemics, Sierra relics and Great Basin native plants found at Steens and Hart Mountains’ floristic “junctions.” We will observe the rejuvenation of species related to grazing recovery efforts at Hart Mountain and explore Steens endemics.

Rising out of southeastern Oregon’s Alvord Desert, the basalt fault block Steens Mountain is a unique floristic island shaped by glaciation and Great Basin plate “rumpling.” Its plant communities rapidly shift from juniper and sagebrush to aspen/riparian to high alpine glacial valleys and lakes near the summit at 9733 ft.

Students will have time to key out plants in a lab session (especially helpful for identifying eriogonum varieties) in addition to Saturday and Sunday trips in the field.

Sponsored by The Siskiyou Field Institute http://www.thesfi.org

Cheryl Beyer has a B.S. degree in Botany and an M.S. degree in Natural Resource Conservation. Cheryl’s expertise includes vascular plants, bryophytes, lichens, and fungi.

Janel Johnson, M.S. has a Bachelor’s degree in botany from Oregon State University. Janel is currently employed at the Nevada Natural Heritage Program and has served as president of the Nevada Native Plant Society since 2011 and she and her husband Reese are co-editors of the Eriogonum Society newsletter.

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July 12 – 14, 2019 – Dana Ross, M.S. offers a butterfly class at the Malheur Field Station sponsored by the Siskiyou Field Institute.

Butterflies of the High Desert

July 12 – 14, 2019 – Dana Ross, M.S. offers a butterfly class at the Malheur Field Station sponsored by the Siskiyou Field Institute.

Harney County, Oregon is known as a butterfly hotspot as well as a migratory bird stop along the Pacific Flyway. We’ll learn both typical and rare species historically seen in southeast Oregon in a classroom session and studying collected specimens. Then we’ll foray to alkaline lakes and hot springs, landscaped areas, bogs and high-elevation sites including Steens Mountain in search of summer butterflies including checkerspots, swallowtails, fritillaries, metalmarks, blues and whites.

Dana Ross, M.S., entomologist, specializes in butterflies and moths. He has studied Oregon insects for over 30 years and currently works in rare butterfly conservation and documents insects at important sites.

Photo credits, Dana Ross

Tadd Reaney a Reynolds HS science teacher, has spearheaded this four day event for Freshman each year. This year Tadd brought 69 students!

Reynolds High School 2019

The Reynolds HS has been coming to MFS for the past 15 years, missing only 2018 when the station was down due to a water crisis. Tadd Reaney a Reynolds HS science teacher, has spearheaded this four day event for Freshman each year. This year Tadd brought 69 students!

According to Tadd, he says “Our four day journey, with 69 teenagers, consist of staying at the field station in Princeton while studying the Wildlife Refuge, Diamond Craters, the Pete French National Historic Round Barn, The Steens Mountain, and the Alvord Desert – The kids soak up the science, history and literature of these places and absolutely have their minds blown with how much they get to see and do in four days.”

The first thing upon arrival is empty the bus and hike up South Coyote Butte so that the students can get a perspective on their surroundings. Tadd says “the MFS has become a charming second home with great memories, wildlife and a taste of life in the desert.” We couldn’t agree more, and look forward to their return each year!

They arrive in awe and wonder, and depart with hugs and smiles. We are committed here at MFS in inspiring young people for the future.

Birding - Late Spring 2019

June 7 – June 12, 2019 – Join Harry Fuller for a chance to see most of the nesting species of Harney County. Common Nighthawks and American White Pelicans will be in the air. Bobolinks should be seen along with water-related birds such as Trumpeter Swan, Black Tern and Wilson’s Phalarope.

Itinerary

Arrive at MFS, gather for a meet and greet, introduction and dinner. After dinner enjoy a sunset walk around the MFS looking for owls, nighthawks, et al.

After breakfast we will visit the MNWR headquarters to look for migrants and any vagrants. From there we will bird along Sodhouse Lane, the Narrows and along Hwy 205 north of the refuge. Return to MFS for a sack lunch and presentation in the classroom.

After lunch we will go east on Sodhouse Lane to Princeton, north to Crane and stop at Crystal Crane Hot Springs to observe birds on the pond. We will return to MFS for a home cooked dinner. After dinner we will look for Short-eared Owls along Center Patrol Road.

After breakfast we will head south on Hwy 205, visiting Buena Vista, Krumbo Lake and Benson Pond.

We will enjoy a sack lunch at Krumbo Lake picnic grounds. After lunch we will bird along the road to Diamond, visit Diamond Craters for Rock Wrens and Canyon Wrens, the French Barn and Dry Lake.

We will return to the MFS for dinner, perhaps an evening visit to the refuge headquarters.

We will leave MFS right after breakfast and head south on Hwy 205. We will bird the basalt cliffs along the road, stop at P Ranch and then Page Springs for lunch. After lunch we will continue our search for Bobolink (not in the fall program) or head up into the lower reaches of the Steen Loop. If we can gain access we will also bird Boca Lake. This will depend on Teresa Wick’s availability.

We will return to MFS for dinner.

We will leave after breakfast and bird our way north on Hwy 205 to Hwy 78. Then to Hwy 20 south to Chickahominy Reservoir, stopping at Sage Hen Rest Area for lunch. Back to MFS for dinner.

Breakfast, pack and depart. End of 6 night program!

 

Harry Fuller
author of: San Francisco’s Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2017/04/20/sfnh/
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/the-great-gray-owl-book/
author of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com

Our Dorms are an integral part of our educational programs having the ability to house up to 30 attendees each.

Dorm Upgrades

Our Dorms are an integral part of our educational programs having the ability to house up to 30 attendees each. They all needed serious attention and Doug and Rose and various volunteers tackled many of the problems in 2019 with some projects being finished just days before the guests arrived. We were so busy we forgot to take very many “before” pictures but many of our past guests know what we were up against. Here is a slide show of some of things we got done.

upgraded water heaters
Before plumbing was completely replaced
More bad plumbing
removed sinks
plumbing in new sinks
fixing deep plumbing problems
new sheet rock for E dorm showers
E dorm showers done and ready
freshly painted window sills
before paint and repairs
A dorm kitchen
A dorm beds clean and ready to go
A dorm commons
painting at the F dorm
F dorm beds
Done
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Birding - Spring 2019

May 22 – 27, 2019 – Join Harry Fuller for a chance to see the results of on-going spring migration. Many nesting species will have just returned. Males will be singing and there will be territorial displays.

Itinerary

Arrive at MFS, gather for a meet and greet, introduction and dinner. After dinner enjoy a sunset walk around the MFS looking for owls, nighthawks, et al.

After breakfast we will visit the MNWR headquarters to look for migrants and any vagrants. From there we will bird along Sodhouse Lane, the Narrows and along Hwy 205 north of the refuge. Return to MFS for a sack lunch and presentation in the classroom.

After lunch we will go east on Sodhouse Lane to Princeton, north to Crane and stop at Crystal Crane Hot Springs to observe birds on the pond. We will return to MFS for a home cooked dinner. After dinner we will look for Short-eared Owls along Center Patrol Road.

After breakfast we will head south on Hwy 205, visiting Buena Vista, Krumbo Lake and Benson Pond.

We will enjoy a sack lunch at Krumbo Lake picnic grounds. After lunch we will bird along the road to Diamond, visit Diamond Craters for Rock Wrens and Canyon Wrens, the French Barn and Dry Lake.

We will return to the MFS for dinner, perhaps an evening visit to the refuge headquarters.

We will leave MFS right after breakfast and head south on Hwy 205. We will bird the basalt cliffs along the road, stop at P Ranch and then Page Springs for lunch. After lunch we will continue our search for Bobolink (not in the fall program) or head up into the lower reaches of the Steen Loop. If we can gain access we will also bird Boca Lake. This will depend on Teresa Wick’s availability.

We will return to MFS for dinner.

We will leave after breakfast and bird our way north on Hwy 205 to Hwy 78. Then to Hwy 20 south to Chickahominy Reservoir, stopping at Sage Hen Rest Area for lunch. Back to MFS for dinner.

Breakfast, pack and depart. End of 6 night program!

 

Harry Fuller
author of: San Francisco’s Natural History: Sand Dunes to Streetcars:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2017/04/20/sfnh/
author of Great Gray Owls of CA-OR-WA:
https://ecowise.wordpress.com/2015/05/08/the-great-gray-owl-book/
author of Freeway Birding: freewaybirding.com
birding website: http://www.towhee.net
my birding blog: atowhee.wordpress.com