Making a bat house is more complicated than one might think. Over the summer, James, using his father's workshop built 24 bat houses! He volunteered his time and his own money to bring this project to fruition.

24 Bat Boxes

James Lane was a junior at Catlin Gable School in Portland, when he attended a spring program in 2019 at Malheur Field Station to build bat boxes.  James’s stepfather, Scott Bowler was to lead the group and at the last minute couldn’t make it.  The students built and repaired bird boxes during their stay instead.

James said “I’m interested in conservation and my step father, Scott Bowler introduced me to the Malheur Field Station. James couldn’t forget the bat boxes and their importance on the refuge.  “It seemed a good way to combine my interests into a school project.  According to Alexis Martinez, biologist at MNWR says “There are 15 species of bats in Oregon, twelve of those species are found at Malheur”.  Test results in 2019 yielded information that the 12 species on the refuge are free of white nose syndrome, a fungus decimating bat populations in some parts of the country.  According to MNWR, bats eat insects, including mosquitoes and are a food source to hawks, owls, and some snakes.  Weasels and raccoons will climb trees to get them.

Making a bat house is more complicated than one might think. Over the summer, James, using his father’s workshop built 24 bat houses! He volunteered his time and his own money to bring this project to fruition.  With help from his step father Scott, they coordinated in November to deliver 24 bat boxes to the Malheur Field Station.  The Malheur Field Station is sharing 10 of these to be distributed and put up all around the MNWR headquarters, Buena Vista and Double O as well as the Malheur Field Station.

James is an incredible young man with no doubt a bright future.  We are thankful to James and his stepfather Scott for their time and donation to the Malheur Field Station.  We may not see James for a while, as he is heading farther east to pursue his studies at Colby College in Maine.  We wish him success and hope to see him again on station in the future.
 
 

July 10-13, 2020 From Steens Mountain to the Alvord Desert, from alpine to meadow to sagebrush steppe, butterflies and moths abound in this hotspot for Northern Great Basin species.

Great Basin Butterfly CANCELLED

CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19

July 10-13, 2020 From Steens Mountain to the Alvord Desert, from alpine to meadow to sagebrush steppe, butterflies and moths abound in this hotspot for Northern Great Basin species. We will base our studies at Malheur Field Station, where we’ll learn both the typical and rare species historically seen in southeast Oregon in a classroom session and by examining collected specimens. Then we’ll foray over the weekend and into Monday, exploring desert canyons, lakes and roadsides and Steens Mountain streams, canyons, steppe and summit. Findings may include swallowtails, checkerspots, coppers, Admirals, fritillaries and blues and whites.

Instructor: Dana Ross, M.S.

Location: Meet and lodge at Malheur Field Station, Harney County, OR

Tuition includes 3 nights shared dorm room: $335 Commuter tuition: $245 Extra nights or single bedroom: add $30 per night

Click Here:

August 14 - 16,2020 The unique mingling of desert and alpine plant communities makes Steens Mountain a hotspot for insect diversity.

Alpine Pollinator Ecology - CANCELLED -

CANCELLED DUE TO COVID-19

August 14 – 16, 2020  Instructor and photo by August Jackson. The unique mingling of desert and alpine plant communities makes Steens Mountain a hot spot for insect diversity. In some years, large migrations of butterflies and dragonflies can be observed along the summit ridge. We’ll explore Steens Mountain’s varied habitats, identifying pollinators and their associated plant species with a particular focus on regional bee fauna. More than 300 species of bees are likely to be found on Steens, including more than a dozen bumble bee species. We’ll spend most of our time observing insects in the field, with some time for lecture and specimen observation at the Malheur Field Station.

Location: Meet and lodge at Malheur Field Station, Harney County, Oregon.

Tuition incl. 2 nights shared dorm room: $270 Extra nights or single bedroom: add $30 per night Commuter tuition: $210

Book direct with Siskiyou Institute below:

Click Here:       

 

August 17-21, 2020 Join us under the darkest sky in the US! Learn about Astronomy and Astro-Photography in this 4 day course.

Astronomy / Astro Photography 2020

Instructor:  Robert Browning is an Engineering Group Leader at Intel in Hillsboro. He has been at Intel for 24 years. He has a PhD in Applied Physics from Portland State University and is an avid amateur astrophotographer.

Day 1: Introduction and Overview / Software for Imaging
Day 2: Minimalist Imaging with a DSLR / Survey of Telescopes for Imaging
Day 3: Telescope Mounts and Guiding / Cameras and Imaging Calibration
Day 4: Operating in the Filed / Basic Image Processing

Instructor:  Doug McCarty was the Planetarium Director at Mt Hood Community College for twenty seven years and has taught astronomy at Lewis and Clark College and Portland State University. He lives in Portland.

Astronomy Schedule TBA

Day 1:
Day 2:
Day 3:
Day 4:

 

Sept 2-5, 2020 "Learn more about the insects of the sagebrush country and their importance to the ecosystem"

Entomology in the High Desert 2020

Sept 2, 2020 – Sept 5, 2020      $300 per person $100 deposit/balance due by Aug 1 – Meals and Lodging included

“Learn more about the insects of the sagebrush country and their importance to the ecosystem. This course will consist of a field trip to observe insects in the field, insect collecting demonstrations, and learning about the insect anatomy and ecology in the classroom”

Matt Medeiros (http://www.mattjmedeiros.com)  the instructor, has been coming to MFS as a student, employee, and biologist since 1995, and has taught Entomology at the high school level.  He is also an active researcher at UNLV who studies the biodiversity, evolution, and conservation of insects in the Hawaiian Islands.

Sept 2 : Arrive, check in by 4pm, settle into lodging. Dinner in dining hall at 6pm. Socialize getting to know each other.

Sept 3 : Classroom sessions & observing insects within walking distance of the classroom. Breakfast in the dining hall at 7:30am, packed lunch in the field, dinner in dining hall at 6pm.

Sept 4: All day field strip. Breakfast in dining hall, with pack lunch in the field.   Dinner upon return in Dining Hall at 6pm

Sept 5: Breakfast and departure.

Sept 18-20, 2020 Please join us at MFS for a weekend of fun and appreciation dinner!

Annual September Gathering 2020 Cancelled Due to Covid

Annual Appreciation Weekend Gathering

September 18-20 – 2020

Please join us at MFS for a weekend of fun and appreciation dinner!

Wander the station and see all the upgrades and changes.  We appreciate your support !

Friday Sept 18:

Evening Social in Greasewood beginning at 6pm

Saturday Sept 19: TBA

Field Strips / Morning TBA / Afternoon “Birding with the Board”

Saturday evening at 6pm, dinner will be provided by MFS. Please call in your RSVP to make sure there is plenty for all. 541-493-2629 or email us at malheurfieldstation@gmail.com

Reservations can be made by calling the office or emailing.

September 23-29, 2020 Ever wonder how the landscape of Harney County came to be?

Geology of the Northern Great Basin 2020

September 23-29, 2020 Ever wonder how the landscape of Harney County came to be? Check out the schedule for Geology of the Northern Great Basin hosted by Michael Cummings.

Michael is a retired Professor of Geology from Portland State University and has a long history with Malheur Field Station. He has been leading university and general-interest geology trips in Northern Great Basin for decades.

The order of the daily program may change due to weather. All days begin with breakfast in the Dining Hall, after which you pack a lunch for the day trip. Lunch and bathroom stops are incorporated each day along the way.

September 23
The six-night class begins after settling into your E-Dorm lodging and having dinner in the Dining Hall with Michael Cummings, PhD. After dinner, there’s an introductory session on geology of the northern Great Basin.

September 24
Interpreting across scale: Hike to top of South Coyote Butte for Interpreting across time: How does the landscape change through time?

Evening session: How do we integrate time, scale, and process when we interpret the evolution of a landscape.

September 25
Visit the Northern fringe of the Harney basin. Welded tuffs: welding zones, structure, sources, interpreting accreted terrains – the old rocks. Dinner in Dining Hall

Evening session: Hydrogeology of the Harney basin – an ongoing study.

September 26
South of the Field Station: Interpreting volcanic contributions to sedimentary environments and Hydrogeology of the Blitzen River.

Evening session: Integrating time, scale, and process in modern landscapes

September 27
Long day! Explore the areas surrounding Steens Mountain; Fault block mountains, Crustal extension and geothermal systems including the Alvord Desert and Catlow Valley.

No evening session

September 28
Exploring Steen Mountain – Steens Basalt and the Columbia River Basalt Group.

Evening session: Miocene evolution of the Columbia River Basalt Group and associated rhyolites.

September 29
Breakfast and departure.

Full cost: $1000 or $950 if you have RV.
$100 reservation deposit with full payment due by August 24. 2020.

Catlin Gable junior high students arrived at MFS in March of 2019 ready to build bat boxes. A change in plans routed the students to the shop to rebuild and build bird boxes instead.

Catlin Gable 2019 Bird Boxes

Catlin Gable junior high students arrived at MFS in March of 2019 ready to build bat boxes. A change in plans routed the students to the shop to rebuild and build bird boxes instead. It was amazing to see those students show off their shop skills as they finished the new and renewed bird boxes, pack up their tools and clean the shop! We’re hoping future birders were being created and we see them in the future!